What should you do if you find out police came to your home to ask you questions? - Criminal Law Questions and Answers- LawQA.com

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What should you do if you find out police came to your home to ask you questions?

I had a strange call at work today, the fellow who lives above me in the apartment building ran into police officers outside of the building. They were trying to gain entrance, at least as he tells me, to speak to me and had some questions for me to answer. I have a clean slate, no trouble with the law, no issues with child support or debt... or anything, to my knowledge. I am a law student, full-time single father, and work part-time as an unemployment advocate. Any ideas how to find out what this was about? If or when I should be questioned? With or without an attorney? I have nothing to hide nor am I a criminal, but this thing asked for a category and police do not tend to do civil disputes.

Answer By Jared Austin
Austin Legal Services, PLC
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It could be a number of things. They could merely want to question you about something or someone you may know that happened in the vicinity or any number of other reasons, some benign and some more serious. Usually they leave a card with contact info when that happens. You can always give them a call to find out what they want. Keep in mind that no one ever has to talk to the police or answer questions. If if makes you feel better, retain an attorney.

Answer Applies to: Michigan
Replied: 8/24/2011

Answer By Samuel Harrison
Harrison & Harrison
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Sounds odd, but if they really want to talk to you, they will be back. If the questioning gets too personal or seems to focus on you, politely tell them you aren't comfortable talking to them and shut up. If they won't leave or won't let you leave, tell them you are saying no more without the advice of an attorney.

Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 8/19/2011

Answer By Kevin O'Grady
The Law Office of Kevin O'Grady
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You should hire an attorney to represent you. Police can always return to ask you questions at inopportune times. They may be very persistent. If you are represented, you can hold out your attorney's card and ask to speak with your attorney and refuse to answer questions.

Answer Applies to: Hawaii
Replied: 8/15/2011

Answer By Andrew Subin
Law Office of Andrew Subin
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You can call them and find out what its about. Before making any statements to them, however, I would talk to an attorney.

Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 8/15/2011

Answer By Craig Andersen
Andersen Law PLLC
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Never talk to the cops without a lawyer present. Since you have no idea why they were looking for you, I would not speak with them at all. You can go on line to the Washington courts website and check to see if there are charges pending but don't cooperate or speak to the police. If they have decided you are guilty, they will use what you tell them to screw you.

Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 8/15/2011

Law Office of Richard Williams
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Hire an attorney to contact the police and find out what this is about. Do not contact them yourself. If you are a law student you do not need any trouble with the police.

Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 8/15/2011

Answer By Roy L. Reeves
Reeves Law Firm, P.C.
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As a law student you should already know the cardinal rule - the less you say about anything the better. Start with the basics, look online. Go the the website of the local sheriff, find out if there is a warrant. Check online at the clerk's office, see if there is a case with your name on it. Check the adjoining county too. If all else fails, call the police station in question, ask if they are looking for you, then ask to speak to the detective in charge of the case and the very first thing you want to know is what role are you playing - ie: suspect, witness, etc. If you are only a witness, they will talk to you on the phone - even then be careful what you say. If the officer will not talk to you on the phone, beware and my advice, do not answer even one single question without a lawyer.

Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 8/14/2011

Law Office of Sara Sencer McArdle
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It is usually a good idea to go to speak to the police with an attorney. You have no idea what this is about. Therefore, you should consult with an attorney who can investigate what this about. .

Answer Applies to: New Jersey
Replied: 8/14/2011

Law Office of Roianne H. Conner
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I suggest that you contact an attorney who will contact the law enforcement agency and find out why the authorities were at your apartment.

Answer Applies to: Alabama
Replied: 8/13/2011

Answer By Jared Altman
Law Office of Jared Altman
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Don't take any chances. Assert your right to an attorney, hire one and have the attorney get to the bottom of it.

Answer Applies to: New York
Replied: 8/12/2011

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