What happens if I ignore creditor phone calls for more than a couple of months? - Bankruptcy Law Questions and Answers- LawQA.com

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What happens if I ignore creditor phone calls for more than a couple of months?

I keep getting creditor phone calls harassing me for money. I haven't talked to them or picked up any of their calls. This has been going on for two months and they are now threatening to close my bank accounts. Is this as bad as it can get? What consequences could I be facing if I continue to ignore them?

Mercado & Hartung, PLLC
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They will eventually give your account to a collections attorney who will sue you and proceed with garnishment, if that remedy is available in your state.

Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 9/21/2011

Answer By Kevin Heupel
Heupel Law
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Creditors have the right to sue you and garnish your wages, which is worse than the phone calls. Thus, you're better to get on a payment plan or file bankruptcy because the situation will only get worse.

Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 9/16/2011

Answer By Andrew Harris
Law Office of Andrew Harris
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Ignoring your creditors for a few months, typically leads to harassing phone calls. However if this continues for many months, it could result in them filing a suit against you. If this occurs you would have the opportunity to respond and or attend a hearing. If you lose at the hearing, the creditor can garnish your bank account, your wages or place a lien on your home. They cannot however close your bank accounts.

Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 9/15/2011

Answer By Katie M. Stone
The Law Offices of Katie M. Stone
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Eventually your creditor's may sue you for the default along with fees and interest. You are not protected from them unless you file a bankruptcy or settle the accounts. Just ignoring them will make them go away for a while; however, eventually they will sue you. I suggest that you go and speak with a bankruptcy attorney to see if it is an option that you should explore. I hope you found this information useful.

Answer Applies to: Florida
Replied: 9/13/2011

Answer By Mark Alonso
Financial Relief Law Center
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If you have unpaid, past due debt, and you are basically trying to "dodge" your creditors, that can result in a few different courses of actions for them to take. In some instances, the creditors may just continue to call and call and eventually charge off the debt and give up. Another possibility is that the creditors may assign the accounts to a law firm to file a collections lawsuit against you. Once a creditor files a lawsuit against you, they are initiating the process for them to obtain a court "judgment" which is basically a court order for you to pay them what is owed. If this happens, and they obtain a judgment, they can "enforce" the judgment against you by: 1- Garnishing your wages- up to 25% of your net income for that pay period 2- Freezing your bank account and withdrawing the funds therein 3- Placing a lien against property that you own Some lenders can actually freeze your bank account if you owe past due amounts to the same entity/ lender with whom you bank, without them first filing a lawsuit against you. You should be conscious of this. All in all, getting harassing phone calls and having them close your accounts are a normal part of the collections process, but you should know that it may just be a matter of time before they start initiating a collections action against you, and if you aren't paying them, and you are a collectible, meaning you work and have a bank account with regular deposits, it is likely they are going to come after you. You won't want to wait until they start suing you or you are in the midst of a wage garnishment, before you start taking a bankruptcy action to protect what you have left.

Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 9/13/2011

Answer By Duncan T Pham
D T Pham Associates, PLLC
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Creditors could file suit against you.

Answer Applies to: Texas
Replied: 9/13/2011

Ross Smith, Attorney at Law
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If you ignore creditor phone calls, things usually just get worse. They start to call you on the job. (Tell your boss you do not take personal calls at work.) They'll call the neighbours. Sometimes they will send someone to knock on the door. Much better you answer the phone and get their name, number, account number and then tell them not to call you again. Section1692 of the Fair Debt Collection Practices allows you to do this. That should shut them up. If they want to, they are welcome to sue. I assume that you have no assets to lose, so let them sue.

Answer Applies to: Ohio
Replied: 9/12/2011

Answer By Tony Yuthas
G. Anthony Yuthas & Assoc.
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They could file collection actions against you and attempt to garnish wages or take bank accounts.

Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 9/12/2011

Answer By Bill Zurinskas
Bankruptcy Law Center
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Creditors tend to sue around 6 months after default. Some creditors will not sue unless they can verify employment status and/or ownership of real property or other significant assets. Once the lawsuit is reduced to judgment, the creditor generally garnishes wages or bank accounts, and places a judgment lien on your real property. NEVER ignore a lawsuit. If you are served a summons and complaint (Lawsuit), contact an attorney immediatedly.

Answer Applies to: Colorado
Replied: 9/12/2011

The Northwest Debt Relief Law Firm
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Eventually they will probably sue you and start garnishing your paycheck and levying your bank accounts.

Answer Applies to: Oregon
Replied: 9/11/2011

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