Can I get fired for traffic warrants? - Criminal Law Questions and Answers- LawQA.com

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Can I get fired for traffic warrants?

I have traffic warrants, and I do not want to lose my job. Can I get fired for having a traffic warrant?

Lawrence Lewis
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Absolutely, YES, IF your job requires you to drive, or the company is strict about employees following the law. So, you have every incentive to retain an attorney.

Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 6/10/2015


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You have not asked a legal question. You have asked a human resource question. This matter is not governed by law, it is governed by company policy. If a company elects to have such a policy, then, yes, you may be discharged for violating that policy. If you have a warrant outstanding for a traffic offense, I suggest you go take care of that immediately. Otherwise, you will get stopped for a minor traffic violation, or even a routine road block, and go straight to jail, with no possibility of bail. (After all, you are already a bail jumper.) That will likely happen at a less convenient time than if you go take care of business voluntarily.

Answer Applies to: Georgia
Replied: 6/9/2015

Answer By Thomas E. Gates

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If having a valid driver's license is a condition to the position that you hold; yes you can be fired if you lose your license.

Answer Applies to: Washington
Replied: 6/9/2015

Answer By Mark D. Keyl

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Mississippi is an employment at will State, which means that you can be fired for any reason that is not discriminatory. Yes, you could be fired for the warrants. I suggest you clear them up before they effect your employment.

Answer Applies to: Mississippi
Replied: 6/9/2015

Answer By Jeff Yeh
Law Office of Jeff Yeh
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Instead of worrying about whether you can get fired, why not focus your attention on getting rid of them? You should hire a lawyer to go to court to recall the warrant. A lawyer can do this without you present, so it is less risky for you.

Answer Applies to: California
Replied: 6/9/2015

Answer By Richard F. Rice

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Probably not unless it is related to your employment.

Answer Applies to: Wisconsin
Replied: 6/9/2015

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