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Mark Brown
State of Practice: Washington
Member Since: 11/3/2011
Last Answer: 08/20/2013

About Me

Attorney Mark Brown has represented clients in numerous litigation matters in trial courts, administrative hearings, arbitrations and mediations. Mr. Brown is on the panel of approved Arbitrators appointed by the King County Superior Court. Mr. Brown also represents as number of small businesses and family partnerships in a variety of corporate and business matters. Attorney Mark Brown was an instructor at the University of Puget Sound, School of Law (now Seattle University School of Law) from 1977 to 1979 before entering private practice in Seattle. Attorney Mark Brown is admitted to practice in California as well as Washington. Additionally, Mr. Brown has served as a court appointed Guardian ad Litem and as a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) representative for minor children in a variety of dissolution and parentage cases. Mr. Brown has substantial experience in complex family law litigation, including marital separation and dissolution, meretricious relationships, domestic partnerships, contested custody, parenting disputes and related matters.

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Mark Brown
State of Practice: Washington
Member Since: 11/3/2011
Last Answer: 08/20/2013

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Wolfstone, Panchot & Bloch, P.S., Inc. - Free legal questions and answers - LawQA.com

Free Answers to your Legal Questions by Lawyers.
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Mark Brown
State of Practice: Washington
Member Since: 11/3/2011
Last Answer: 08/20/2013
© 2017 MH Sub I, LLC. All rights reserved.
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Wolfstone, Panchot & Bloch, P.S., Inc. - Free legal questions and answers - LawQA.com

Free Answers to your Legal Questions by Lawyers.
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Mark Brown
State of Practice: Washington
Member Since: 11/3/2011
Last Answer: 08/20/2013
Answer: In Washington State, whether the court orders the other party to contribute to the payment of your attorney fees depends ...read more
Answer: Under the law of Washington state; unless or until the court ordered obligation stated in the Decree to pay alimony (cal ...read more
Answer: No but it is often more economical to have an attorney who practices in the county where the action is filed to limit tr ...read more
Answer: In Washington state, a parent can be held legally responsible for liability created by most conduct of a child so long a ...read more
Answer: I infer that you are referring to a "guardian" of a child whose parents pass away before the child is a legal adult. No ...read more
Answer: There are limitations on the power of a Texas court to exercise jurisdiction over the children UNLESS the children have ...read more
Answer: If a Decree of Dissolution has been entered, that Decree remains in force unless or until it is vacated and the former s ...read more
Answer: A signed agreement regarding custody/visitation and parenting is evidence of your mutual intent; but it is NOT a court o ...read more
Answer: The Washington Relocation of Children Act, RCW 26.09.405 et. seq., gives you the right to seek sanctions, including cont ...read more
Answer: I infer that the mother has "supervised visitation" pursuant to a court order based on concerns that the court has regar ...read more
Answer: Your recourse is to make a motion for Contempt for the father's willful failure to comply with the court order(s).
Answer: Under Washington state law, you can apply the CD monies as you determine appropriate. Keep an accounting of how the pro ...read more
Answer: At 18, the grandson is a legal adult. Neither the parents, nor the grandparent, have "custody". The circumstances under ...read more
Answer: My strong advice is to have your husband sign an "Agreed Order Dismissing Dissolution Action". Upon the facts that you ...read more
Answer: Most employer-sponsored retirement plans, including 401(k)'s, are completely protected from creditors except debts owed ...read more
Answer: In Washington state, as in most jurisdictions, a divorce does not require the consent of both spouses. If your husband w ...read more
Answer: Under Washington state law, "shared custody" usually also entails joint decision making regarding medical treatment. If ...read more
Answer: Your question raises a couple of points worth noting. First, a "joint custody" order (called a "Parenting Plan" here in ...read more
Answer: I may not be clearly understanding your question; but if the opposing attorney filed pleadings with the court in respons ...read more
Answer: Since your divorce action is still pending, your recourse is to make a Motion to the court for temporary custody of your ...read more
Answer: Adultery is not a crime. There is no legal consequence if a separated spouse has a relationship during separation.
Answer: The proceeding to which you refer is called a Dependency action in Washington state. The court's Order of Dependency is ...read more
Answer: In Washington state, the child support statute provides generally that the "primary residential parent" (the parent wit ...read more
Answer: You do not state whether there is any Parenting Plan, custody order, or any other court order in place establishing your ...read more
Answer: "Supervised visitation" is a term used in a court order. You should check to determine if she has filed a court action a ...read more
Answer: Under Washington State law, you can file your case in the county where your "reside" or where your spouse resides. To " ...read more
Answer: Your question is a little unclear to me what "payment" you refer to. Under Washington State law, a biological father w ...read more
Answer: Your son should consult with an experienced attorney who can advise in concrete terms how to gather the available police ...read more
Answer: In Washington state, you can prepare a Parenting Plan without an attorney. The forms are available through the court; an ...read more
Answer: Adoption is a court administered process. The court will not approve an adoption without formal notice to the birth fat ...read more
Answer: At least in King County (Washington) the court has a policy permitting the final Parenting Plan to be entered if the par ...read more
Answer: The preferred course is a "paternity" court action (called "Parentage" in Washington state). Absent appropriate court or ...read more
Answer: A person cannot simply "sign away parental rights". Under Washington state law, if you were married to the mother, your ...read more
Answer: It is very unlikely that she will get half of the assets; but is sounds like she may have tried this before and perhaps ...read more
Answer: If you have legally "adopted" the child, then all rights of the biological parent are terminated. Her chances are slim a ...read more
Answer: This question should be directed to your attorney since s/he was at the settlement conference and is familiar with the f ...read more
Answer: In Washington state courts, such "status conferences" are court orders requiring your attendance. Contact the court asap ...read more
Answer: Whether a "guardianship" is necessary and appropriate depends entirely on the underlying facts which are not disclosed i ...read more
Answer: That depends on a variety of factors, including his earnings and ability to pay, and whether there are any other resourc ...read more
Answer: No. But by doing so it become their money.
Answer: Contact the Prosecutor's Office in the county in which you reside. They have a specific office for handling your needs.
Answer: Under Washington state law, a person becomes a legal adult at age 18. As an adult, your daughter can move from the home ...read more
Answer: The claims involving the automobile will absolutely affect your credit - and have much more serious effects if she is in ...read more
Answer: Enlisting in the military will not change your legal obligation to provide support for your child.
Answer: Given the amount of money at stake, it would be in your interests to consult with an attorney and have him/her review th ...read more
Answer: There is absolutely a conflict of interest. Write the lawyer a letter citing your objection, and/or file an objection w ...read more
Answer: In Washington state, you need to file a Third Party Petition for Custody. You will need to demonstrate that both parent ...read more
Answer: One must examine the specific language of your Parenting Plan (court order). In Washington state there is a specific pr ...read more
Answer: The answer depends on precisely what the written court order says; not on your recollection of what the commissioner sai ...read more
Answer: In Washington state, either party (or both parties) can personally appear before a Judge/Court Commissioner in the Ex Pa ...read more
Answer: In Washington state, she is a legal adult at age 18. The police will not take any action on the "runaway" complaint. Sh ...read more
Answer: In Washington state, the Washington Relocation of Children Act, RCW 26.09.405 et. seq. governs the procedure for providi ...read more
Answer: The parents can give you a written "power of attorney" to make certain limited decisions regarding the children. That wi ...read more
Answer: The husband must obtain a court order to force you to move from the home. That order can be requested in a divorce proc ...read more
Answer: The issue will be resolved at a court hearing. The "custody papers" of the ex-wife is simply her request. The father/hu ...read more
Answer: You begin by filing your Petition for Dissolution with the court. Thereafter, you will have to make a request to the co ...read more
Answer: You are legally obligated to facilitate the visitation until the son is a legal adult. In Washington state, that occurs ...read more
Answer: The court will require the written consent of the biological parent to the adoption by another.
Answer: In Washington state, by statute, one spouses' moral failings are not relevant evidence on issues of property division or ...read more
Answer: The Washington Relocation of Children Act, RCW 26.09.405 et. seq., requires that you provide Notice of your intention to ...read more
Answer: Your father must file a motion with the court seeking court approval of your travel. The court can override the mother' ...read more
Answer: If the mother and father are married, he is legally presumed to be the father regardless of the birth certificate. He ca ...read more
Answer: The "step dad" can adopt only with the written consent of the biological father.
Answer: Where separate property assets are used after marriage to repair/improve a community property home, there may be a lien ...read more
Answer: Under Washington community property law, the contribution of separate property (i.e., pre-martial assets) or community m ...read more
Answer: Not without a court order. Take the initiative to get a court ordered parenting plan for your son.
Answer: The obligation to pay the $25,000 should be either (1) confirmed by a Promissory Note signed by the Husband and secured ...read more
Answer: The fact that the writing is "notarized" is of no significance. A notary seal simply authenticates the signature; but d ...read more
Answer: Presumably, your husband will have you served with the pleadings. You will have 20 days to respond.
Answer: Visit your local Social Security office to determine your eligibility.
Answer: If there is a court order directing you to pay child support, you MUST get that order vacated or modified on the basis t ...read more
Answer: The birth father can seek visitation through the court process - regardless of whether he pays support. You should seek ...read more
Answer: If the adoptive father starts a court proceeding for custody of your son, the criminal background of your fiance/new spo ...read more
Answer: Management of businesses or rental properties are common issues during a divorce. Here is some feedback: All rental inco ...read more
Answer: If she will not agree voluntarily to move, the only option for forcing her removal before the expiration of the lease te ...read more
Answer: Seek a Domestic Violence Protection Order immediately. Based on the facts presented, the court will restrain his contac ...read more
Answer: Your question does not provide critical information regarding what the current court orders provide to visitation and tr ...read more
Answer: Once the child is born, the biological father can file a Parentage court action (known in most jurisdictions as a "pater ...read more
Answer: The sworn statement cannot simply be rescinded. I suppose the person who made the sworn statement 9 years ago can make ...read more
Answer: It means that you have not delivered the court papers to the defendant in the manner that is required by statute or cour ...read more
Answer: Based on the brief facts presented in your question, it seems that (1) you made a gift of the diamonds to your son; wher ...read more
Answer: Take a step back and take a deep breath. Now, read your own question again. You cannot place your children at physical ...read more
Answer: Yes. You will have to file a Parentage court action (known commonly as a paternity action) to obtain an order of child s ...read more
Answer: First and foremost - congratulations. The police will take no action whatsoever. Get a certified copy for your birth c ...read more
Answer: No contact literally means "No Contact". The custodial parent can (and should) decline the father's call to the child; a ...read more
Answer: That depends on to whom the gift is made. Under Washington community property law, if the gift is made to one spouse; th ...read more
Answer: Whether the father is on the birth certificate or not is irrelevant. You can file a Petition for Parentage (known as "pa ...read more
Answer: Though you refer to the legal status of the MIL as a "guardianship", I doubt that a court authorized guardianship exists ...read more
Answer: Your recourse is to file a parentage court proceeding (known in other states as a "paternity" action) to (1) restrict th ...read more
Answer: Children can talk to a lawyer at any age. (Incidentally, there is no legal significance whatsoever to being under or ov ...read more
Answer: The court decree entitles you to claim the tax deduction in 2012. The fact that your child spend 3 additional weeks with ...read more
Answer: To increase the prospect that you will have control over the limitations placed on mother's visits with your son, you sh ...read more
Answer: The answer to your question is almost certainly in the final orders entered in your divorce. Such orders, usually canned ...read more
Answer: If the home was acquired during the marriage, BOTH spouses have a community property interest in the home. Whether one ...read more
Answer: Text messages are often used as evidence. Be aware that there are some procedural issues re text messages (they can be ...read more
Answer: If child is living with a 3rd party, and not with either parent, then DSHS (Office of Child Support) can make BOTH paren ...read more
Answer: His keeping the children in violation of the court order is a clear basis for Contempt. Take the initiative to file a Mo ...read more
Answer: The proceeds from the insurance is an asset to be divided as part of the final property settlement. Deposit the check a ...read more
Answer: He should e-mail both the former wife and her attorney re his visitation plans/requests. (Incidentally, I have no idea w ...read more
Disclaimer: The information provided on this site is not legal advice, does not constitute a lawyer referral service, and no attorney-client or confidential relationship is or should be formed by use of the site. The attorney listings on the site are paid attorney advertisements. Your access of/to and use of this site is subject to additional Supplemental Terms.
© 2017 MH Sub I, LLC. All rights reserved.
Terms & Conditions | Privacy Policy | IB Cookie Policy